Category Archives: History

Open Letter from a WWII Vet about the Shutdown

Dear VoteVets supporter -

Last week, John Boehner said that Republicans were locked in an “epic battle” to keep the government shutdown going.

As a World War II veteran, I fought in six epic battles. I helped fight the Nazis in the North African seas, and took part in operations that liberated Italy and the South of France, from Germany.

The Tea Party Shutdown is not an epic battle — it is bad governance.

Americans and veterans like me depend on our entire government being open.

I filmed a television ad with VoteVets, and it’s on the air starting today. I hope you’ll watch it and contribute to help keep it up.

http://action.votevets.org/shutdown-ad

After receiving General Wesley Clark‘s email last week, I responded with my personal story about how the shutdown impacts my life, while expressing my disgust with the Republican Party’s politicization of the World War II Memorial shortly after the shutdown began.

I served this nation with honor. Today, I can’t say the same thing about most Republicans in Congress.

Thank you for standing up for me,

Redge Ranyard
World War II Veteran
VoteVets.org

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On This Day…

Soviet Premier Nikita Khruchchev in Vienna.

Soviet Premier Nikita Khruchchev in Vienna. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In 1958, Nikita Khrushchev became Soviet premier in addition to first secretary of the Communist Party.

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On This Day…

Menachem Begin, Jimmy Carter und Anwar Sadat i...

Menachem Begin, Jimmy Carter und Anwar Sadat in Camp David (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

In 1979, Prime Minister Menachem Begin of Israel and President Anwar Sadat of Egypt signed the Camp David peace treaty at the White House.

 

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On This Day…

Autograph Alexey Leonov

Autograph Alexey Leonov (Photo credit: AndreasSchepers)

In 1965, the first spacewalk took place as Soviet cosmonaut Aleksei Leonov left his Voskhod 2 capsule and remained outside the spacecraft for twenty minutes, secured by a tether.

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On This Day…

In 1868, the impeachment trial of President Andrew Johnson began in the United States Senate.

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On This Day…

In 1947, President Truman established what became known as the Truman Doctrine to help Greece and Turkey resist Communism.

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On This Day…

In 1941, President Roosevelt signed into law the Lend-Lease Bill, providing war supplies to countries fighting the Axis.

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On This Day…

In 1985, Konstantin U. Chernenko, Soviet leader for just thirteen months, died at age seventy-three. His death was announced on March 11. Politburo member Mikhail S. Gorbachev was chosen to succeed him.

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On This Day…

In 1917, Russia’s February Revolution (so called because of the Old Style calendar used by Russians at the time) began with rioting and strikes in St. Petersburg.

 

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Cambodian Statue Looted During Bombing and Genocide in Limbo at Sotheby’s

Cambodia has asked the United States for help in recovering a thousand-year-old statue of a warrior that at Sotheby’s in New York and that experts believe was looted amid the bombing of the Vietnam War and the killing fields of the Khmer Rouge.

The statue, which has a catalog estimate of $2 million to $3 million, was pulled from auction at the last minute last March after the Cambodian government complained it had been “illegally removed” from the country.

The Department of Homeland Security has opened an investigation. Cambodian officials have held off asking for the piece to be seized while they negotiate with Sotheby’s.

The auction house says that the seller is a “noble European lady” who acquired it in 1975, the year the Khmer Rouge took power following widespread bombing. Although it was severed from its feet and pedestal, which were left at a Cambodian archaeological site, Sotheby’s says there is no proof that it was taken illegally.

Archaeologists and Cambodian officials say the case of the footless statue is all the more poignant because researchers have found the pedestal and feet belonging to the artwork. The discovery was made in Koh Ker, sixty miles northeast of Angkor Wat. Koh Ker, another city in the Khmer empire, was at one time a rival capital to Angkor, which was once the largest city in the preindustrial world, more than three times the area of New York City today.

The sculpture, which is five feet tall and weighs 250 pounds, is one of two athlete-combatants from the mid 900s who come from one of Koh Ker’s temples; it is about 200 years older than the famous sculptures at Angkor Wat.

In 2007, archaeologists matched the other statue, on display since 1980 at the Norton Simon Museum in Pasadena, California, to its similarly detached pedestal.

All clues suggest the work at Sotheby’s was plundered in the 1970s amid the chaos, when looters hacked their way into temples, pillaged antiquities, and sold them to Thai and Western collectors.

“Every red flag on the planet should have gone off when this was offered for sale,” said Herbert V. Larson Jr., a New Orleans lawyer and antiquities expert who teaches legal issues involving smuggled artifacts. “It screams ‘loot.’ ”

To write the catalog entry for the statue, Sotheby’s hired Emma C. Bunker, a co-author of the book “Adoration and Glory: The Golden Age of Khmer Art.” She called it an unrivaled example of Khmer sculpture, and the lot was on the catalog’s cover. It was withdrawn on the day it was to be sold, March 24, 2011, after a Cambodian official working with the United Nations, Tan Theany, complained in a letter “that this statue was illegally removed from the site” and asked Sotheby’s to “facilitate its return.”

Via The New York Times.

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